Unit 8 - Linear Models & Tables (8th Grade)

Unit 8

Students will extend the study of linear relationships by exploring models and tables. They will use functions to model relationships between quantities and describe the rate of change. The study of statistics expands from more simplistic samples and collections in previous units to bivariate data, which can be graphed and a line of best fit determined.

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Linear Models & Tables

Use functions to model relationships between quantities. Investigate patterns of association in bivariate data.

MGSE8.F.4 Construct a function to model a linear relationship between two quantities. Determine the rate of change and initial value of the function from a description of a relationship or from two (x, y) values, including reading these from a table or from a value of a linear function in terms of the situation it models, and in terms of its graph or a table of values.

MGSE8.F.5 Describe qualitatively the functional relationship between two quantities by analyzing a graph (e.g., where the function is increasing or decreasing, linear or nonlinear). Sketch a graph that exhibits the qualitative features of a function that has been described verbally.

MGSE8.SP.1 Construct and interpret scatter plots for bivariate measurement data to investigate patterns of association between two quantities. Describe patterns such as clustering, outliers, positive or negative association, linear association, and nonlinear association.

MGSE8.SP.2 Know that straight lines are widely used to model relationships between two quantitative variables. For scatter plots that suggest a linear association, informally fit a straight line, and informally assess the model fit by judging the closeness of the data points to the line.

MGSE8.SP.3 Use the equation of a linear model to solve problems in the context of bivariate measurement data, interpreting the slope and intercept. For example, in a linear model for a biology experiment, interpret a slope of 1.5 cm/hr as meaning that an additional hour of sunlight each day is associated with an additional 1.5 cm in mature plant height.

MGSE8.SP.4 Understand that patterns of association can also be seen in bivariate categorical data by displaying frequencies and relative frequencies in a two-way table. a. Construct and interpret a two-way table summarizing data on two categorical variables collected from the same subjects. b. Use relative frequencies calculated for rows or columns to describe possible association between the two variables. For example, collect data from students in your class on whether or not they have a curfew on school nights and whether or not they have assigned chores at home. Is there evidence that those who have a curfew also tend to have chores?